Welcome to Project: Gorgon!


Project: Gorgon is a 3D fantasy MMORPG (massively-multiplayer online role-playing game) that features an immersive experience that allows the player to forge their own path through exploration and discovery. We won't be guiding you through a world on rails, and as a result there are many hidden secrets awaiting discovery. Project: Gorgon also features an ambitious skill based leveling system that bucks the current trend of pre-determined classes, thus allowing the player to combine skills in order to create a truly unique playing experience.

The Project: Gorgon development team is led by industry veteran Eric Heimburg. Eric has over a decade of experience working as a Senior and Lead Engineer, Developer, Designer and Producer on successful games such as Asheron’s Call 1 and 2, Star Trek Online and other successful Massively Multiplayer Online Games.



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  1. #11
    Senior Member Eachna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crissa View Post
    The trinity I think is annoying. I really prefer systems where anyone can do either role. The idea that there's someone's job just to stand there and click on other players is... Silly.
    Well...I'm not expecting trinity play here (nor advocating for it) but since this sounds a bit like a comment about healing...

    Healing in a trinity group is *awesome*. It's a way to play an entirely different game within the larger game. Not because you don't like the basic game, but for the challenge.

    Playing as DPS or a tank, you do your thing based on what the boss and adds are doing. The boss and the adds are stupid because they're scripted.

    Players might do "stupid" things (the party isn't ready and someone charges the boss screaming their name as a battle cry ). But, people are more intelligent than scripts and they do different and smarter kinds of stupid stuff. Humans are amazing and glorious in the kinds of stupid they can produce.

    Healers have their own meta-game that revolves around judging the intelligent human stupidity of the other players.

    * Are the other players doing what they "should" do?

    * If they are, how can I most efficiently and with the least spent resources, do my part?

    * If they aren't, am I capable of fixing what they've done? Should I? Can I be bothered? Am I willing to give up resources that probably won't be replaced to save the knuckleheads from themselves?

    * When doing the numbers for MMO fights, the designers boost damaging attacks before healing skills. Healers are usually operating at a healing score deficit and so there's not "enough healing" without careful juggling. It takes a lot of fast thinking to handle cooldowns, mana pools, and consumables to make sure you're outputting the healing you're expected to produce while still being able to respond in the case of multiple human stupids.

    It's the furthest thing from standing there clicking on other players.

  2. #12
    Member Yertle's Avatar
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    I think the MMORPG genre is currently on the decline, but not necessarily due to the Games or Gaming Companies, but more so due to the type of culture we live in now. To keep this short, when the early generation MMORPGs hit the internet was still young and the culture was one of experiencing the big huge worlds and of exploration. The culture now is "smaller" due to the growth of the internet and everything at our fingertips so the vastness and awe of exploration has been replaced by being the first to the top or just utilizing resources (Wiki/websites/forums/etc.) to answer the questions. So that along with a culture more inclined for short, quick, and mobile games clashes with many aspects of the MMORPG genre as a whole.
    This is just my opinion/view and from a pretty high level.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Crissa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eachna View Post
    It's the furthest thing from standing there clicking on other players.
    Meh, I've done it, and it's not really different than playing ranged DPS. You've got a series of target you have to keep hitting; you have to dodge the ranged effects. To me, trinity is boring because your position and action don't change.

    I did melee healing in Molten Core back when Clearcasting was a melee thing. Boy, everyone hated that. Whack the flaming critter with a book, run back, cast the big heal on the tank, run back in... Always make sure Regrowth was running on time. Of course, that was before healmeters counted HoTs to the caster so only the big heal counted. Outlands was fun; I could be tanking, use bash, pop to caster, heal my DPS, then dive back in. That was cool.

    And it's quite true the broad size of the internet is actually working against community, making it hard to build up that next MMO or whatnot. But it also means there's a place for experiments like PG. ^-^

  4. #14
    Senior Member Tagamogi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crissa View Post
    I did melee healing in Molten Core back when Clearcasting was a melee thing.
    Oh, hi. My introduction to raiding was getting tossed into an all-rogue group in Molten Core and being told to keep them alive while they kept running into the aoe from the fire-breathing dog. Oh, and remember to drop totems for them, too. I still think it was one of the funnest things I've ever done.

    Dps feels somewhat boring to me - I think of it as trying to do the largest damage possible without pulling aggro, and once you figure out which of your abilities do the most damage, there isn't that much variation. With healing, you don't just have to heal the most amount possible, you have to decide on the appropriate heal for the occasion - big, fast or "oh noes the tank is going to dieeeeee!!!!!!!!" I also like the egotistical aspects of getting credit for single-handedly saving a group from wiping with a timely heal. I played a chanter in EQ even longer ago, and one of the things I enjoyed most there was also being able to save the whole group, just with a timely mez instead of a heal. Playing dps, you are just one of the crowd banging away on the mob...

    But hey, tastes differ.

    My problem with the holy trinity system is that it often translates into groups not happening because they need one of the absolutely required classes in order to do anything. What I'd really love to see is a system where non-dps players and dps players contribute equally to the group, without one particularly play style being absolutely required for group success. I've no idea how to implement an ideal like that in practical game design, though.

  5. #15
    Junior Member Anikitos's Avatar
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    Well where to start with, lets just start with how mmorpgs worked in the past:

    Leveling and questing was most of the time a team content. You would go to the open world, often to some spawns and had to team. This way you got to know people too in the process. Moreover, even it can be tedious if no company, games being grindy meant you had to do that for years to get into endgame. That had lead to players staying in a game longer cause most wanted to at least see the endgame. Later on powerleveling and archer/aoe users appeared and they were forming bonds with classes they needed(like healers or tanks or both). Moreover to do teaming and people wanting to team with them people were learning to at least basically socialise - which was important especially on teaching the young players(teens or younger). Add to this there were less mmorpgs and online games in general so the fanbase apart from being more social it was split to less games. Sure the old models had their flaws but promoted the social aspect with many forms. For example the hardcore PVP games being in a group was essensial so you dont get killed indefinitely and have people to play with.

    Then WoW changed all. It taught a new generation of gamers that questing should be solo. That you should wait to level up(fast with minimal grind) and do instances, even some raids all alone or at most with 1-2 friends. Friends? You dont need a friendlist in WoW. There are random instance tools for dungeons, raids, pvp...you name it. Guilds were just a place to get passive buffs. No longer guilds were much needed either. To say it more clearly, many online gamers experienced the first mmo experience in WoW(or the various games that tried to copy WoW) learning that social aspect is completely optional and it usually wastes their time.

    That lead in part to most of the modern games today feel barren if their server has 1k players whereas old games felt lively with 100+ all because a successful mmo taught most new gamers(consider how many millions passed through WoW even if they dont play it anymore) to play games like a single player. Eventually those players realise that a mmo as a single player has less quality than a game designed to be a single player so they move on.To me that is the number one reason.

    Then mmoirpgs get in decent amount every year giving a feeling to the gamers they should at least try-check all. That gives big population shifts hindering even more the long life and social aspect of mmorpgs since ideally they want their players sticking around more and form bonds. So to say it more clear, more mmos are being released than the playerbase can absorb. From personal experience if working a full time job you can play at most 2 mmos having significant presence in both, not more. So a big general problem is a huge amount of players being in a constant mmo "jumping" from an older to a newer to a newer to a newer staying usually between 4 and 6 months per mmo.

    Taking the last line up there, mmo companies sensing that players usually dont stay long, and wanting to sell things on their cashshops(and endgamers usually buy most) they made the transitions from a newbie to endgamers ridiculous fast. So by design on many new games the journey doesnt matter, only the destination does. But this has flaws. The biggest flaw is companies cant create fast enough content to accomodate those that reach endgame in 2 months or less. Every new expansion will give probably 1-2 more months. Till next expansion most players move to other games.That had been also done because from the early years lots(even me myself back when I was a teen) complained on grinding so we got our wish.

    Bottom line, excluding sandboxes and old-schoolers, is most mmosrpgs went into a trap of becoming mostly towards single player feel with little social interaction, fast to finish content and thus players that stay little jumping from mmo to mmo till they get bored of not finding something to hook them up



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